Friday, August 22, 2014

What Kind of Jobs Do History Majors Land?

Here is the link to a very interesting article recently published on the History News Networks that Dr. Horowitz would like to share with our history majors. The author uses a new tool offered by LinkedIn to analyze data on what history majors do with their degree after college. Enjoy!

Thursday, August 21, 2014

More on Careers in a Networked World


Following up on the previous post on LinkedIn, here is a link to an interesting interview with Reid Hoffman and Ben Casnocha, two of the founders of LinkedIn.  In it they talk about how to use LinkedIn but, maybe just as importantly, how to function and take advantage of a networked world.  One of the values of disciplines like history is that it helps you understand and adjust to change, which is only accelerating.

Sunday, August 17, 2014

New Tool for Looking at Employment

LinkedIn has announced a new way of looking at the link (get it, link.. linked in) between your field of study and future employment. The official blog announcement, "Does Studying Fine Art = Unemployment," discusses the Field of Study Explorer.  Basically, what the tool does is finds connections between what people who have linkedin accounts studied and what they listed as occupations.  It isn't perfect but it is interesting.  Check it out.  Hopefully, you will see something that points you in a direction you hadn't considered.  The time I spent playing with it seems to confirm what I've been telling students (shout out to students who took Digital History), the future belongs to self learners and self starters.


Friday, August 15, 2014

Dr. Marinari Wins National Research Grant

Dr. Maddalena Marinari has received a postdoctoral grant to conduct research at the Immigration History Research Center (IHRC) at the University of Minnesota. The IHRC supports research on migration, race, and ethnicity in the U.S. and the world.

Dr. Marinari will travel to Minneapolis next summer to work on her project on undocumented immigration from Europe. As part of her grant, she will also present her work in a public lecture.

Friday, August 8, 2014

Dr. Horowitz Publishes Article on Soccer Club

Dr. Joel Horowitz, professor of history at St. Bonaventure University, has just published the article “Football Clubs and Neighborhoods in Buenos Aires before 1943: The Role of Political Linkages and Personal Influence” in the Journal of Latin American Studies, which is published by Cambridge University Press.

The article discusses how in the first decades of the 20th century, the inhabitants of greater Buenos Aires formed innumerable soccer clubs as part of a burgeoning civic culture. Many of these clubs not only proved enduring but helped to shape the sense of neighborhood that dominated much of the cultural and political world of the city. In this they differed from clubs in other South American cities, which tended to have much less of a barrio identity.

However, successful soccer teams required assistance to acquire land and construct stadiums. The evidence of club records and the local press shows that as the clubs grew in size and importance, politicians and other leading neighborhood figures became critical in obtaining the necessary resources for them, but in turn they made use of their association with the clubs to aid their election campaigns and build up their constituencies and clienteles.

USGS Maps

Continuing my interest in digital and interactive historical maps check out the USGS Maps online.